15 Creative Middle School Art And Crafts Activities

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Welcome to this collection of engaging art and craft activities, specifically designed for middle school teachers looking to inspire their students and spark their creativity.

In this article, you'll find a diverse range of art and craft activities, each with a detailed guide, easiness rating, and equipment list, ensuring you have everything you need to get started.

These activities offer a wealth of benefits for both teachers and students. They encourage creative expression, build essential skills, and foster a deeper appreciation for the world around us. They will also support cross-curricular learning and teamwork, making them an invaluable resource for any middle school teacher.

Whether you're looking to incorporate art and craft into your existing lesson plans or searching for new ways to energise your classroom, these activities provide an exciting opportunity to explore the world of art and craft activities with your students. So, dive in and discover the endless possibilities that await you and your class.

Jump to the following activities:

 

1. Collaborative Murals

Making murals is an educational art activity where students work together to create a large, themed mural. This activity fosters teamwork, communication, and creative expression, as students explore various artistic techniques and styles. Collaborative murals is ideal for middle school teachers, as it encourages group work and cooperation while allowing students to develop their artistic skills and individuality.

 

 

Step by Step Guide:

  1. Choose a theme: Begin by selecting a theme for the mural, such as a historical event, a literary work, or an environmental issue. This theme will serve as the foundation for the artwork and inspire students' creativity.
  2. Divide the class: Split the students into smaller groups of 3-5 members. This allows for better collaboration and communication within the teams, while ensuring each student has a chance to contribute.
  3. Plan the mural: Have each group brainstorm ideas and sketch a rough layout of their mural section. Encourage students to consider composition, colour, and style, while incorporating the chosen theme.
  4. Prepare materials: Provide students with large sheets of paper or canvas, as well as various art supplies, such as paint, brushes, markers, and pastels. Ensure there are enough materials for each group.
  5. Create the mural: Allow each group to work on their designated section of the mural, encouraging communication and collaboration throughout the process. Monitor the progress and offer guidance or assistance as needed.
  6. Assemble the final piece: Once all sections are complete, arrange them together to form the full mural. Display the artwork in a prominent location within the school to showcase the students' hard work and creativity.

 

Things to watch out for

Keep an eye on the size and scale of each section to ensure they fit together seamlessly in the final piece. Encourage students to stay on theme and maintain a consistent style throughout the mural.

Easiness

This activity is moderately easy for middle school students and can be adjusted to suit their skill levels. The entire project may take several class sessions to complete, depending on the size and complexity of the mural.

Equipment: 

  • Large sheets of paper or canvas
  • Paint (acrylic or tempera)
  • Brushes in various sizes
  • Markers or coloured pencils
  • Pastels or chalk
  • Adhesive or tape for assembling the final mural
  • Art smocks or aprons (optional, for protecting clothing)

 

2. Stamp Storytelling

This is a captivating and imaginative activity in which students use rubber stamps to create scenes that inspire written narratives. This project helps develop both visual and verbal storytelling skills while sparking students' creativity. Teachers will appreciate this activity as it combines art and literacy, encouraging students to think critically about the stories they create and how images can convey meaning.

Step by Step Guide:

  1. Select rubber stamps: Provide a diverse assortment of rubber stamps featuring various images, such as animals, objects, and symbols. Alternatively, students can create their own custom stamps.
  2. Plan the scene: Encourage students to think about the story they want to tell through their stamped scene. They should consider the characters, setting, and key events that will unfold in their narrative.
  3. Stamp the scene: Using ink pads in different colours, students can stamp their chosen images onto paper, arranging them to create a visually appealing and cohesive scene.
  4. Write the story: Once the scene is complete, students should write a short story or narrative inspired by their stamped images. Encourage them to be inventive and use descriptive language to bring their stories to life.
  5. Share and discuss: Have students share their stories and stamped scenes with the class. Encourage discussion about how the images influenced their narratives and the different interpretations of the same images.

Things to watch out for

Ensure that students carefully clean the stamps after each use to avoid ink smudging and colour mixing. Remind students to consider the scale and placement of images to create a well-balanced scene.

Easiness

This activity is relatively easy for middle school students and can be completed within one or two class sessions. The complexity of the written narratives may vary depending on students' writing abilities.

Equipment:

  • Rubber stamps (various images, or custom-made)
  • Ink pads in different colours
  • Paper (preferably a heavier weight to avoid ink bleeding)
  • Writing materials (pens or pencils)
  • Cleaning supplies for stamps (paper towels or damp cloth)

Why not customise your own stamps for your students or browse our rubber stamps for teachers.

 

3. Junk Sculpture

Junk Sculpture is an environmentally conscious art and middle school crafts activity in which students construct sculptures from recyclable materials. It encourages artistic expression, critical thinking, and environmental awareness as students repurpose waste materials into unique, three-dimensional art. Sculpting with junk will help students understand the importance of sustainability while unleashing their creativity.

 

 

Step by Step Guide:

  1. Collect materials: Gather a variety of recyclable materials, such as plastic bottles, cardboard, tin cans, and paper. Encourage students to contribute by bringing in clean, used items from home.
  2. Brainstorm ideas: Have students brainstorm and sketch their sculpture concepts, considering the materials they have available and the message they want to convey through their artwork.
  3. Prepare the workspace: Set up a designated work area with ample space for students to create their sculptures. Provide tools such as scissors, glue, and tape for assembling the pieces.
  4. Create the sculptures: Allow students to begin constructing their sculptures, offering guidance and assistance as needed. Encourage them to explore different techniques and think creatively about how to repurpose the materials at hand.
  5. Display and discuss: Once the sculptures are complete, display them in the classroom or a school exhibition. Encourage students to share their creative process and the environmental message behind their artwork.

 

Things to watch out for

Ensure that all materials are clean and safe for use, and that students handle sharp objects, such as scissors, with care. Provide supervision and guidance when using any tools or adhesives.

Easiness

This activity is moderately easy and adaptable for students, allowing for varying skill levels and interests. The time spent on the project may vary, but students should expect to dedicate at least two to three class sessions to complete their sculptures.

Equipment:

  • Recyclable materials (plastic bottles, cardboard, tin cans, paper, etc.)
  • Scissors or cutting tools
  • Glue, tape, or other adhesives
  • Additional art and craft supplies for decorating (paint, markers, etc.)
  • Protective materials (newspaper or tablecloths) for work surfaces

 

4. Flipbook Animation

Flipbook animation is a captivating and educational activity that introduces students to the basics of animation by creating their own flipbooks. This hands-on project nurtures artistic talent, storytelling skills, and an understanding of motion and timing in animation. It also offers a fun, low-tech way to explore the principles of animation and engage students in a creative learning experience.

 

Step by Step Guide:

 

  1. Plan the story: Encourage students to brainstorm a simple, short storyline for their flipbook animation. They should consider characters, actions, and the progression of events.
  2. Choose the materials: Provide students with small, uniformly sized paper or cardstock for creating the flipbook. A stack of sticky notes also works well for this purpose.
  3. Create a template: Have students lightly number the bottom corner of each page in sequence to help with assembling the flipbook later.
  4. Draw the frames: Instruct students to draw each frame of their animation on a separate page, starting with the first scene. They should pay attention to the movement and progression between each frame to ensure smooth animation.
  5. Assemble the flipbook: Once all frames are complete, have students stack the pages in numerical order and secure them together using a binder clip, staple, or tape.
  6. Test and refine: Encourage students to flip through their animation, making adjustments to the drawings as needed for smoother transitions and better visual flow.

 

Things to watch out for

Remind students to keep their drawings simple and consistent, as too much detail can make the animation appear cluttered and difficult to follow. Monitor the students' progress to ensure they maintain a clear storyline and smooth transitions between frames.

Easiness

This activity is relatively easy for students, although the level of difficulty can be adjusted according to students' artistic abilities. Students may spend one to two class sessions working on their flipbook animations, depending on the complexity of their storylines.

Equipment:

  • Small, uniformly sized paper or cardstock (or sticky notes)
  • Pencils or pens for drawing
  • Erasers for correcting mistakes
  • Binder clips, staples, or tape for securing the flipbook
  • Optional: coloured pencils or markers for adding colour to the animation

 

5. Graffiti Art

Graffiti is an exciting and contemporary art activity that allows students to explore the world of street art in a safe and controlled environment. This project helps develop students' creativity, self-expression, and understanding of various artistic styles. It also introduces an unconventional art form and encourages students to think outside the box while respecting public spaces.

 

Photo courtesy of Duncan Cumming under creative commons

 

Step by Step Guide:

  1. Discuss graffiti art: Begin by discussing the history and styles of graffiti art and the ethical considerations around creating street art in public spaces.
  2. Plan the artwork: Encourage students to brainstorm and sketch their graffiti designs, focusing on bold colours, unique lettering, and creative imagery that reflects their personal style or conveys a message.
  3. Prepare the workspace: Set up a suitable workspace, such as a large sheet of paper or a plywood board, for students to create their graffiti art. Ensure adequate ventilation if using spray paint.
  4. Transfer the design: Have students transfer their sketched designs onto the chosen surface, using pencils or chalk to outline their artwork.
  5. Create the graffiti art: Provide students with suitable art materials, such as spray paint, acrylics, or markers, to bring their designs to life. Encourage them to experiment with layering, shading, and blending techniques to achieve the desired effect.
  6. Showcase the artwork: Display the completed graffiti art in the classroom or school exhibition, allowing students to share their creations and discuss their experiences.

 

Things to watch out for

Ensure students are using materials safely and responsibly, particularly when working with spray paint. Emphasise the importance of respecting public spaces and the legality of creating street art without permission.

Easiness

This activity is moderately easy and can be adapted to suit varying skill levels. Students may spend one to three class sessions on their graffiti art, depending on the complexity of their designs.

Equipment:

  • Large sheets of paper or plywood boards
  • Pencils or chalk for sketching and outlining
  • Spray paint, acrylics, or markers (suitable for the chosen surface)
  • Protective materials, such as gloves, masks, and aprons (if using spray paint)
  • Newspaper or drop cloths to protect the workspace

 

6. Stamped Patterns and Textures

Making stamped patterns and textures is a great middle school crafts activity that encourages students to explore pattern and texture using rubber stamps and various materials. Why not customise your own stamps for your class? This project fosters creativity, artistic expression, and an appreciation for the endless possibilities in art. Middle school teachers will find this activity beneficial, as it introduces students to a versatile technique, expands their artistic vocabulary, and allows them to experiment with different materials.

 

 

Step by Step Guide:

  1. Gather materials: Provide students with an assortment of rubber stamps, or have them create their own using materials such as foam sheets, erasers, or potatoes. They might even design their own rubber stamps.
  2. Discuss patterns and textures: Encourage students to observe patterns and textures in their surroundings and discuss how they can be incorporated into art.
  3. Plan the artwork: Have students brainstorm ideas for their stamped patterns and textures, considering the stamps they have available and the composition they would like to create.
  4. Prepare the workspace: Set up a clean workspace with paper or other surfaces for students to stamp on, and provide a variety of ink pads or paint trays.
  5. Create the stamped patterns: Instruct students to begin stamping their designs, experimenting with various patterns, textures, and colour combinations. Encourage them to layer stamps and overlap designs for added visual interest.
  6. Share and discuss: Once the artwork is complete, allow students to share their creations and discuss the techniques they used to achieve their patterns and textures.

 

Things to watch out for

Ensure that students clean stamps between colour changes to avoid unintentional mixing of colours. Remind students to apply even pressure when stamping to achieve consistent results.

Easiness

This activity is relatively easy for children and can be adapted to suit varying skill levels. Students can spend one to two class sessions on this project, depending on the complexity of their designs.

Equipment:

  • Rubber stamps or materials to create custom stamps (foam sheets, erasers, potatoes, etc.)
  • Ink pads or paint trays with various colours
  • Paper or other surfaces to stamp on
  • Optional: additional art supplies, such as coloured pencils or markers, for embellishment.

 

If you like rubber stamps, why not read our blog: 8 Creative Ideas For Using Customised Rubber Stamps In The Classroom

 

7. Shadow Puppet Theatre

This imaginative activity combines storytelling, visual art, and performance. Students will create their own shadow puppets and bring stories to life through enchanting performances. This activity is perfect for middle school teachers, as it promotes collaboration, fosters creativity, and enhances communication skills while providing an enjoyable learning experience.

 

Courtesy Fabrice Florin under creative commons

 

Step by Step Guide:

  1. Discuss shadow puppetry: Introduce students to the history and techniques of shadow puppetry, including examples from various cultures.
  2. Choose a story: Encourage students to select a short story, folktale, or create an original narrative for their shadow puppet performance.
  3. Design the puppets: Have students sketch their puppet designs on paper, considering the characters, settings, and any props needed for the story.
  4. Create the puppets: Provide materials such as cardstock, scissors, and craft sticks for students to create their shadow puppets. They should cut out their designs and attach them to the sticks using glue or tape.
  5. Build the stage: Assist students in constructing a simple shadow puppet theatre using a large cardboard box, fabric or paper screen, and a light source.
  6. Rehearse and perform: Encourage students to practise their performance, focusing on puppet manipulation, voice acting, and coordination. Once ready, have them present their Shadow Puppet Theatre to the class.

 

Things to watch out for

Remind students to create bold, simple silhouettes for their puppets, as intricate details may not be visible in shadow form. Ensure the light source is safely positioned to avoid accidents.

Easiness

This activity is moderately easy and can be adapted to suit different skill levels. Students may spend two to four class sessions on this project, depending on the complexity of their story and puppets.

Equipment:

  • Paper for sketching puppet designs
  • Cardstock for creating shadow puppets
  • Scissors for cutting out puppet shapes
  • Craft sticks, glue or tape for assembling puppets
  • Large cardboard box, fabric or paper screen, and a light source for constructing the shadow puppet theatre
  • Optional: additional materials for embellishing puppets or the stage, such as coloured paper or paint

 

8. Claymation

Claymation allows students to produce stop-motion animation using clay figures while teaching storytelling, patience, and attention to details as well as sparking artistic expression. Claymation is a rewarding activity, as it combines art, technology, and narrative skills, offering a well-rounded educational experience.

 

 

Step by Step Guide:

  1. Discuss Claymation: Introduce students to the concept of stop-motion animation and Claymation, showing examples of famous clay animations.
  2. Brainstorm ideas: Encourage students to develop an original story or adapt an existing tale for their Claymation project.
  3. Design characters and sets: Instruct students to sketch their characters, props, and sets, keeping in mind the constraints of working with clay.
  4. Create clay figures: Provide students with modelling clay to sculpt their characters and props, ensuring they create sturdy, poseable figures.
  5. Assemble the set: Assist students in constructing their sets, using materials like cardboard, paper, and fabric.
  6. Set up cameras: Help students position their cameras or smartphones on tripods, ensuring they are stable and focused on the set.
  7. Animate the story: Instruct students to move their clay figures incrementally, taking a photo after each movement to create the illusion of motion.
  8. Edit the animation: Teach students how to compile their photos into a video using stop-motion animation software or apps, and add sound effects or voice-overs.
  9. Share and discuss: Organise a screening of the finished Claymation projects, allowing students to discuss their creative process and challenges.

 

Things to watch out for

Remind students to handle their clay figures gently, avoiding smudging or distorting their creations. Ensure that the camera remains stable and in the same position throughout the animation process.

Easiness

Claymation can be a challenging activity, requiring patience and persistence. Students may spend several class sessions working on their projects, depending on the complexity of their animations.

Equipment:

  • Modelling clay in various colours
  • Drawing materials for sketching characters and sets
  • Cardboard, paper, and fabric for set construction
  • Camera or smartphone with a tripod
  • Stop-motion animation software or app
  • Optional: audio recording equipment for sound effects and voice-overs

 

9. Mandala Art

Mandala art is a captivating activity that involves creating intricate, symmetrical designs, often inspired by nature or geometry. Students will develop their concentration, creativity, and fine motor skills while exploring different patterns and colours. Middle school teachers will appreciate this activity for its calming, meditative qualities, making it an excellent choice for promoting mindfulness and self-expression in the classroom.

 

 

Step by Step Guide:

  1. Introduce mandalas: Begin by explaining the history and cultural significance of mandalas, showing students examples from various traditions.
  2. Demonstrate techniques: Teach students basic drawing techniques for creating symmetrical patterns, including the use of a compass, ruler, and protractor.
  3. Choose a theme: Encourage students to select a theme for their mandala, such as nature, geometric shapes, or a personal interest.
  4. Plan the design: Instruct students to sketch their mandala on paper, starting from the centre and working outwards, creating a balanced, symmetrical pattern.
  5. Transfer the design: Have students lightly draw their design onto a larger sheet of paper or canvas, ensuring the lines are precise and even.
  6. Colour and embellish: Provide students with a variety of art materials, such as coloured pencils, markers, or paint, to fill in their design and add details.
  7. Reflect and share: Invite students to share their completed mandalas with the class, discussing the choices they made and their experience creating the artwork.

 

Things to watch out for

Encourage students to work patiently and methodically, taking care not to smudge or blur their designs. Remind them to keep their patterns symmetrical and balanced.

Easiness

Mandala Art is moderately easy for children, with the complexity depending on their artistic ability and the intricacy of their designs. Students may spend one or two class sessions working on their mandalas.

Equipment:

  • Drawing paper or canvas
  • Pencils and erasers
  • Compass, ruler, and protractor
  • Coloured pencils, markers, or paint
  • Optional: reference images or examples of mandalas

 

If you have younger pupils, why not read: 11 Creative Art Activity Ideas For Primary School Teachers

 

10. Collage Portraits

Collage Portraits with customised rubber stamps is an engaging art activity where students create unique self-portraits using a mix of collage materials and personalised rubber stamps. Rubber stamps are cheap and easy to buy - and you can design your own rubber stamps for this activity if you like. This activity encourages creativity, self-expression, and the development of fine motor skills. Teachers can foster individuality and artistic exploration while promoting a sense of community within the classroom.

 

 

Step by Step Guide:

  1. Create custom rubber stamps: Guide students in designing their custom rubber stamps, drawing inspiration from their interests, hobbies, or personality traits. Once the designs are complete, carve the stamps using rubber carving blocks or order them from a custom stamp supplier.
  2. Gather collage materials: Provide a variety of materials, such as magazines, newspapers, patterned paper, and fabric scraps, for students to choose from when constructing their collage backgrounds.
  3. Assemble collage backgrounds: Instruct students to select and arrange their chosen materials on a sheet of paper or canvas, creating a visually appealing and personalised background for their portrait.
  4. Stamp the portrait: Have students use their custom rubber stamps to add unique elements to their collage, representing aspects of their personality or interests.
  5. Add facial features and details: Encourage students to use additional art materials, such as markers, paint, or coloured pencils, to draw facial features and other details on their portrait.
  6. Share and discuss: Invite students to present their finished collage portraits to the class, explaining their choices of materials, stamps, and other design elements.

 

Things to watch out for

Remind students to work carefully when using sharp tools for carving stamps and to choose a balanced mix of materials for their collages to avoid clutter or visual confusion.

Easiness

This activity is moderately easy for children, with the complexity depending on the intricacy of their rubber stamp designs and collage compositions. Students may spend two to three class sessions completing their collage portraits.

Equipment:

  • Rubber carving blocks or custom stamp supplier
  • Carving tools (if carving stamps by hand)
  • Magazines, newspapers, patterned paper, and fabric scraps
  • Paper or canvas
  • Glue or adhesive
  • Markers, paint, or coloured pencils
  • Scissors

 

Explore our customizable stamps and design your own stamps for your project.

 

11. String Art Magic

String art is a great activity in which students create eye-catching patterns and designs by weaving colourful strings around nails or pins on a board. This hands-on project not only teaches mathematical concepts, such as geometry and symmetry, but also develops fine motor skills and creativity. String art encourages patience and concentration, while offering a fun, collaborative experience in the classroom.

 

 

Step by Step Guide:

  1. Choose a design: Have students select or create a design, ranging from simple shapes to more intricate patterns, depending on their skill level.
  2. Prepare the board: Provide each student with a wooden or foam board, and instruct them to draw their chosen design lightly with a pencil.
  3. Hammer nails or pins: Carefully guide students to hammer nails or insert pins along the lines of their design, ensuring they are evenly spaced.
  4. Begin stringing: Have students select a coloured string, tie a knot around the first nail or pin, and then start weaving the string around the nails following their design.
  5. Switch colours and layers: Encourage students to switch string colours and build layers to create depth and contrast in their artwork.
  6. Finish and display: When satisfied with their design, students can tie off the string, trim any excess, and showcase their finished string art piece.

 

Things to watch out for

Supervise students closely while hammering nails or inserting pins, ensuring they use tools safely. Also, remind them to maintain even tension in the string to avoid sagging or loose sections.

Easiness

This activity is moderately easy, with complexity depending on the chosen design. Students may spend one to two class sessions completing their string art project.

Equipment:

  • Wooden or foam boards
  • Nails or pins
  • Hammer (for nails) or pin insertion tool
  • Pencil
  • Ruler or template (optional)
  • Colourful strings
  • Scissors

 

12. Upcycled Fashion

Making upcycled fashion creations is an inventive activity where students transform old or discarded clothing items into unique, fashionable pieces. This sustainable project not only nurtures creativity and design skills but also promotes environmental awareness and responsible consumption. As a middle school teacher, you may enjoy the opportunity to encourage teamwork and problem-solving while exploring fashion and design.

 

Courtesy Wallpaper Flare

 

Step by Step Guide:

  1. Gather materials: Ask students to bring in old, unwanted clothing or source materials from thrift stores or donations.
  2. Brainstorm ideas: Encourage students to sketch out potential designs or search for inspiration online, focusing on revamping and personalising their chosen clothing items.
  3. Plan the transformation: Guide students in identifying the necessary steps to alter their items, such as cutting, sewing, or adding embellishments.
  4. Execute the design: Under supervision, students can start implementing their design ideas, adjusting and refining their creations as needed.
  5. Showcase the results: Organise a fashion show or display to exhibit the students' upcycled fashion pieces, celebrating their creativity and resourcefulness.

 

Things to watch out for

Make sure students use scissors, needles, and other tools safely. Provide support and guidance for those less experienced in sewing or altering clothes.

Easiness

This activity is moderately easy, with the complexity depending on the chosen design. Students may spend several class sessions working on their upcycled fashion projects.

Equipment:

  • Old or unwanted clothing items
  • Sketchbook or paper for brainstorming
  • Pencils or markers
  • Scissors
  • Sewing needles and thread
  • Embellishments (buttons, patches, fabric paint, etc.)
  • Sewing machine (optional)
  • Pins and pin cushion
  • Ruler or measuring tape
  • Fabric glue (optional)

 

13. Blackout Poetry Magic

Blackout Poetry is a literary activity where students create their own poems by selectively blacking out words from existing texts. This imaginative exercise allows children to discover their inner poets, encouraging creativity, language skills, and critical thinking. This activity can help to enhance students' appreciation for poetry while offering a fresh, unconventional approach to language arts.

 

 

Courtesy Tom Woodward under creative commons

 

 

Step by Step Guide:

  1. Provide materials: Offer students a variety of printed texts, such as newspapers, magazines, or book pages.
  2. Browse and select: Encourage students to skim through the texts and choose a page that speaks to them or offers interesting word combinations.
  3. Identify words or phrases: Instruct students to search for words or phrases that resonate with them, forming the basis of their blackout poem.
  4. Connect the dots: Ask students to link the chosen words or phrases, creating a coherent poem by either circling or underlining them lightly with a pencil.
  5. Blackout surrounding text: Using a black marker, students can then obscure the remaining text, leaving their poem clearly visible.
  6. Add artistic flair: Invite students to embellish their blackout poems with illustrations or decorative elements that complement their poetic creation.

 

Things to watch out for

Ensure that students are not overwhelmed by the initial text and guide them towards focusing on individual words or phrases.

Easiness

This activity is fairly easy, with the main challenge being the identification of words and phrases. Students might spend approximately 30 minutes to an hour completing their blackout poems.

Equipment:

  • Printed texts (newspapers, magazines, book pages)
  • Pencil
  • Black marker
  • Optional: coloured markers or pencils for illustrations and decorations

 

14. Papier-Mâché Masterpieces

Papier-Mâché is a hands-on art activity that allows children to create 3D sculptures using newspaper, glue and a touch of creativity. This activity encourages the development of fine motor skills, spatial awareness, and artistic expression. This is a versatile activity and can be adapted to various themes, subjects, and skill levels, making it an ideal addition to any creative curriculum.

 

 

 

Step by Step Guide:

  1. Prepare the base: Determine the shape or object you want to create and select an appropriate base, such as a balloon, cardboard, or plastic bottle.
  2. Create the paste: Mix equal parts of water and white glue or flour in a large container until you achieve a smooth consistency.
  3. Tear newspaper: Instruct students to tear newspaper into strips, ensuring they are not too thick or too thin.
  4. Dip and apply: Have students dip the newspaper strips into the paste, removing any excess before applying them to the base.
  5. Layer up: Encourage students to create multiple layers, letting each layer dry before adding the next.
  6. Add details: Once the paper-mâché structure is dry and sturdy, students can use additional materials like cardboard or pipe cleaners to add details.
  7. Paint and decorate: Provide students with paints and brushes to bring their creations to life with colour and personality.

 

Things to watch out for

Ensure that the layers dry completely before adding more to avoid a soggy or unstable structure.

Easiness

This activity is moderately easy, although it requires patience for drying between layers. Students may spend several hours or even days to complete their masterpieces, depending on the complexity and drying time.

Equipment:

  • Base material (balloon, cardboard, plastic bottle)
  • White glue or flour
  • Water
  • Large container
  • Newspaper
  • Additional materials for details (cardboard, pipe cleaners, etc.)
  • Paints and brushes

 

15. Nature's Creative Canvas

Making art from nature is a great outdoor activity where children use natural materials to create beautiful works of art. This engaging activity encourages creativity, and appreciation for the environment and develops observational skills. This activity is great because it connects students to their surroundings, supports cross-curricular learning, and fosters teamwork and collaboration, making it a fantastic addition to any lesson plan.

 

 

 

 

Step by Step Guide:

  1. Set the scene: Choose an outdoor area with a variety of natural materials such as leaves, twigs, stones, and flowers.
  2. Discuss the plan: Explain the activity to the students and encourage them to observe their surroundings carefully, paying attention to the various shapes, colours, and textures of the natural elements.
  3. Gather materials: Instruct students to collect an assortment of natural materials, emphasising the importance of not damaging living plants or disturbing wildlife.
  4. Create a canvas: Have students lay out a flat surface, such as a large piece of paper or cloth, to serve as their canvas.
  5. Design and arrange: Encourage students to experiment with the materials they've collected, arranging them in creative patterns, shapes, or even representations of landscapes or creatures.
  6. Secure the artwork: If desired, students can use glue or tape to fix their nature-inspired creations to the canvas.
  7. Display and discuss: Once the nature art is complete, invite students to share their work, discussing their creative choices and the environmental inspiration behind their designs.

 

Things to watch out for

Ensure that students treat their environment respectfully and avoid potentially harmful plants or insects.

Easiness

This activity is relatively easy, and children can spend anywhere from 30 minutes to a few hours, depending on the complexity of their designs and available time.

Equipment:

  • Outdoor area with a variety of natural materials
  • Large piece of paper or cloth (optional)
  • Glue or tape (optional)

 

READ: Why not make a board game with your class?

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